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Resistance training

31

Oct'17

The Complete Beginner’s Guide to High Intensity Resistance Training (HIT): Recommended routine, order of exercises, tempo, time under load, rest between exercises and frequency of training (part 3)

Here it is, the post I have been building up to over the previous two articles. Having laid the foundations in part 1 and part 2 of the beginner's guide to High Intensity Resistance Training, I am going to dive into revealing the workout routine that I consider a great introduction and solid foundation to your HIT journey.

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25

Oct'17

The Complete Beginner’s Guide to High Intensity Resistance Training (HIT): full-body workouts, types of exercise, technique and momentary muscular failure (part 2)

After writing the last post, I have been excited to get on with detailing the practical elements of HIT for you to use. But before I do that, we have some ground to cover on the theory and science behind High Intensity Resistance Training. In this post, I will detail the fundamentals of a HIT workout, including the types of exercises used, correct technique and discuss momentary muscular failure (MMF), the role it plays and how to get the most out of it.

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11

Oct'17

The Complete Beginner’s Guide to High Intensity Resistance Training (HIT): What it is, how it compares to other forms of exercise and the results you can expect to get (part 1)

For a while I have wanted to put out a free in-depth resource to act as a thorough introduction to the topic of High Intensity Resistance Training (HIT) for those of you who are just discovering it, and as a refresher for those who need to get back to the basics of what simply works. This is the article I wish that I had had access to when I first began resistance training in earnest back in 1996. It will be a simplified summation of the 21 years of experience I have; training myself, training with other experts in the …

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04

Oct'17

The Ultimate Science-Based Resistance Training Routine for Older Adults

On 28th September 2017, a mini review into resistance training for older adults was published in Experimental Gerontology titled “A minimal dose approach to resistance training for the older adult; the prophylactic for aging”. This is a very exciting piece of research, thrilling for the simplicity and practicality of its conclusions and recommendations. It is the kind of paper that I want to beam into the hands of every individual over the age of 60 and every health influencer of that age group too. Scratch that, if all other resistance training research on earth was somehow decimated and just this …

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13

Sep'17

Resistance training can reverse ageing

In March this year, the BBC reported that a drug had been trialled in animals that could reverse certain aspects of ageing causing old mice “to restore their stamina, coat of fur and even some organ function.” Inspired by this, I wanted to understand more about how the ageing process works and if exercise can have a similar effect on the body; can exercise reverse ageing?   What are senescent cells? This trial drug, a peptide worked by reducing the number of senescent cells in the mice. As we age, irreparable DNA damage begins to accumulate in cells, one of three …

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11

Apr'16

Physically Fit for Life

In the last article posted to this blog, I discussed the current widespread attraction to extremes in the realms of physical fitness and appearance and the potential damage that this can do. If you haven’t read that article you can check it out: Attraction to the Extremes of Physical Fitness. I want to spend this post developing an idea alluded to in the previous post, that of a more sane approach: the goal of being physically fit for life. Lets start out working backwards by defining the results we require of exercise, results that will match our aim of being …

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13

Mar'15

Pre-Exhaustion Technique and REX Conference 2015

In the exercise world, there is often fierce debate over protocol, application and technique. At its most productive this debate can spur on experimentation, enabling us to refine the application of exercise protocol. Sometimes we need to question elements of the protocol that have been ingrained in HIT since its inception or since the time of its initial popularity in the 70s and 80s: the original Nautilus era. In this post I want to discuss a research paper that does just that, one that I have been meaning to write about for a while. Researchers James Fisher, Luke Carlson, James …

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19

Dec'14

MMF better than RP: Strength and Body Composition Results (part 3)

The first two posts relating to this piece of research (The effects of low volume resistance training with and without advanced techniques in trained participants. Jürgen Giessing, James Fisher, James Steele, Frank Rothe, Kristin Raubold, Björn Eichmann) looked at the reasons we consider this research paper to be of value, the exercise protocols used and the differences in protocol between the three groups (ssRM, ssMMF and ssRP). In this post, we will look at how the researchers gathered the data and the actual results of the study in detail and we will take a look at the conclusions that can …

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02

Nov'14

Momentary Muscular Failure better than Repetition Maximum: Protocol Differences (part 2)

Last week, I wrote about a new piece of exercise research (The effects of low volume resistance training with and without advanced techniques in trained participants), and what makes this research valuable. I covered aspects such as the basic protocol that the three groups performed and the similarities between the specific exercise routines performed by each group. In this post, I want to discus how the protocols studied, differed between the groups – in effect what is it that the research actually looks at and provides data about.   Remember that the three groups were: ssRM: individuals in this group performed a single set to (self-determined) Repetition …

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21

Oct'14

Momentary Muscular Failure better than Repetition Maximum: Methodology and Participants (Part 1)

A new and exciting paper on resistance training titled, “The effects of low volume resistance training with and without advanced techniques in trained participants” has recently been published by Minerva Medica. Researchers include: Jürgen Giessing, James Fisher, James Steele, Frank Rothe, Kristin Raubold and Björn Eichmann. This a paper that will prove to be of great interest to personal trainers and those involved with or who partake in resistance training, strength training and exercise in general. Let’s see why now.     Key findings The researchers found that single sets taken to MMF produced better results in strength and hypertrophy for …

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