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High Intensity Training

11

Jun'15

Metabolism, in the mind’s eye

In my experience, most high-intensity training (HIT) practitioners don’t focus on metabolism. It’s hard to blame them. Discussion of force, velocity, muscle tension, and momentary muscle failure have real-world applications that clients can knowingly experience. Metabolism is practically invisible and lacks easily accessible realtime metrics that we can share with our clients. However, we would be remise if we didn’t share the truly amazing adaptations that occur within seconds of finishing a HIT session. The energy systems Before we jump into the adaptations that occur from HIT, a basic understanding of metabolism is necessary. Most people are familiar with the …

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06

May'15

Equilibrium

Having recently immersed myself in the methods of high intensity training, a very common trend which has made itself apparent over the last short while is the mammoth disconnect which exists between what the public generally believes about exercise, and what is actually testable, verifiable, and true. Unsurprisingly, this disconnect extends beyond what the public generally considers to be a ‘normal’ exercise routine, and actually flirts with what many consider to be the outer edges of fitness. If we think about exercise in terms of concentric circles, what most people will generally place in the middle – as being the …

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16

Apr'15

High Intensity Training: Can you do it without a Personal Trainer?

High intensity training is an evidence-based approach to resistance exercise, an approach that is particularly attractive as it produces excellent results with relatively little time investment required. Not only does it stimulate hypertrophy of muscle tissue, it also concurrently improves strength, flexibility, bone density, metabolism and cardiovascular health. All of these improvements can be achieved and most likely optimized with just one or two, 10-25 minute workouts a week. This is obviously a hugely attractive proposition, so attractive that some think that it must be sales pitch or exaggeration that so little exercise can provide the full gamut of exercise …

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02

Sep'14

25 Frequently Asked Questions About High Intensity Training

In this article, I want to share 25 of the most frequently asked questions about High Intensity Training (HIT). I often get clients or friends asking these questions and over the years, I found the following answers to be effective in explaining HIT and resolving any resistance or confusion people have – especially those new to this type of exercise, or people who haven’t read Body By Science – might have. I’ll often start out by explaining that HIT is a specific approach to exercise that stimulates the body to produce total fitness results including: hypertrophy, strength, cardiovascular improvement, flexibility enhancement and bone mineral …

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17

Jul'14

What is Momentary Muscular Failure, Why We Seek It Out… and How To Get There

Achieving Momentary Muscular Failure (MMF) has long been a key tenet of High Intensity Training (HIT): the goal, the pinnacle, the crowning achievement for each exercise performed in a routine.   What is MMF and why does it occur? Let’s simplify things by looking at MMF specifically within the context of dynamic exercise consisting of concentric (lifting) and eccentric (lowering) muscle actions. In this context, momentary muscular failure refers to the moment in an exercise set, when the force output of the targeted musculature has been reduced to a level equal to the force of the chosen load, due to …

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02

Mar'14

10 reasons to love High Intensity Training

Do you need a reason to love HIT? Probably not, but here is why we love HIT.

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14

Oct'13

Sean’s High Intensity Workout Explained

In the HIT workout that follows you will see Sean performing exercises from his A Routine, the workout is performed on the HITGYM AIO by David Health Solutions. And so Sean begins starting the routine with a Lower Back movement. The primary targeted muscles are those of the lumbar and thoracic spine. Note Sean takes his time in starting the movement, this is important as we are aiming to take 4 seconds or more for the weight to come off the stack. It is especially important with regards to the lower back (but also with all other exercises) to keep …

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17

May'13

Training for Life: HIT

HIT or High Intensity Strength Training has value beyond that which all other forms of physical activity confer. It doesn’t matter whether you have never exercised before, whether you are a seasoned athlete, male or female, 12 years old or 80 years old the principles of HIT are applicable and safe to apply to all. HIT is about long-term fitness, health and strength. Know that every possible physiological benefit that it is possible to attain from exercise, is achieved when you employ HIT. To the uninitiated this may sound like a bold claim, yet HIT is nothing more than a …

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31

Jan'13

Fitness Trends 2013 show the need for High Intensity Training

Recently I read the ‘Worldwide Survey of Fitness Trends for 2013’ conducted by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and although High Intensity Training (HIT) was not directly written about, there was an element of HIT within every one of the top twenty trends. As the survey stated; a prediction was made with regards to the amount of workers within the fitness industry and the fact that more businesses are realising that having a healthier happier work force is far more productive. This in turn creates a need and increased demand for Certified Personal Trainers and persons seeking to be qualified. So my point …

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09

Jan'13

Cardiovascular Health and High Intensity Training

Many individuals looking to improve their health through an exercise program think first and foremost about improving their “heart health” or cardiovascular condition. The vast majority of people believe that they will need to perform a modality of exercise that is traditionally considered cardiovascular or “aerobic”. Options that typically come to mind are running, treadmills, rowing machines, cycling, dance or other aerobic group classes. The belief then follows that if they want to improve their strength too they will have to add in some form of weight training in addition to their “aerobic “ training. Although this approach to physical …

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